è country, but above all to inform the

è
The
speech just quoted is sourced from a formal speech by 35th president
of the United States John Fitzgerald Kennedy, commonly referred to as JFK.

à The quote came from his Inaugural address in which the newly
elected president was given time to speak to his audience the day of his
inauguration (which is a day to celebrate the beginning of a new term for the elected
president)

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à Typically the Inaugural address is used to convey the
presidents hopes and dreams for the nation as well as to give the public an
idea of how they want to contribute to the well being of their country, but
above all to inform the audience of the elected president’s intentions as
leader.

è
This
inaugural address aimed to fulfill three purposes which were also the main
themes of his speech as well,

o  
The
primary was to present the U.S. as a powerful nation

o  
The
secondary was to encourage idea of worldwide peace

o  
The
tertiary was to inspire and promote sense of progress to Americans at the time

è
This
inaugural address was also aimed at 3 audiences

o  
The
primary audience targeted every citizen of the United States, despite their
social class, gender, age, beliefs, party (Due to the fact that it was an
inauguration of an American president)

o  
The
secondary audience was directed towards The Soviet Union

o  
The
tertiary audience was essentially set for the rest of the world whether it be
any allies, neighboring countries, or potential enemies of the U.S.

 

(1 min 30
secs) Context & History:

è
Having
taken place on the East Portico of the Capitol located in Washington D.C., 43
year old John F Kennedy delivered his Inaugural Address in front of the
citizens who attended his inauguration as well as to the millions who owned a
television or radio worldwide. The address was delivered on January 20th
1961, and was 13 minutes and 55 seconds long.

è
The
height of the Cold war was to have been around the time of John F. Kennedy’s
Speech, thus playing a large role into what he addressed to the public.

o  
The
zeitgeist established at the time was that of overall renovation of the United
States

§ 
Idea
was based around moving forward into the 1960’s as a “New America”

·           
And
where everyone wanted to be part of a model era in which everyone had the
responsibly to rebuild and support this new period.

·           
Where
many reforms would occur to better the nation

·           
And
especially one in which peace over war would be promoted.

o  
Already
having had around 14 years of conflict between The Soviet Union in which the
inventing of bombs and bomb threats, subversion of communists into America, as
well as overseas wars had influenced every day American life through movies,
jobs, and education for the Americans people and therefore lead Kennedy to
focus a considerable amount of his address towards his secondary audience, the
soviet union.

 

(1 min) Structure
and Organization:

è
The
speech being broken into 27 smaller paragraphs gave Kennedy leeway to discuss a
broad variety of topics as well as an opportunity to speak about and reference
them in several different areas throughout his speech. At its most basic form,
the speech can be broken down into 4 main parts.

o  
The
first highly referencing America’s origins and founding figures

§ 
Shown
by sentences such as “revolutionary beliefs for which out forebears fought,”
and “we are the heirs of that first revolution”

o  
Then
following into a section dedicated towards his pledging towards several groups
of people

§ 
With
repetition of the phrase “To those,” as well as “we pledge”

o  
Continued
by an notion of equality between powers

§ 
Seen
in repetition of the phrase “let both sides” as well as reference to an unnamed
opposing power referred to as both (in which it is presupposed that America is
one of the powers included in the phrase “both”)

o  
And
concluding with the idea of regrowth and hope for a brighter future.

§ 
Demonstrated
by phrases such as “a new world of law, where the strong are just and the weak
secure.” Or “In your hands, my fellow citizen, more than mine, will rest the
final success or failure of our course.

è
The
paragraphs being broken into these paragraphs gave power to Kennedy as an
orator by providing him multiple opportunities to use a variety of oral
persuasion techniques and stylistics devices on his audience as well as focus
on his ideas of homestead power, foreign peace, and American renewal.

 

(3 mins) Diction
Choice:

è
 Kennedy’s choice of diction immensely aided
his the main themes of presenting the U.S. as a powerful nation, encouraging
the idea of worldwide peace, and inspiring as well as promoting a sense of progression
to the Americans at the time

è
Within
the first part of the speech he repetition of words in the medial position of a
clause such as in the phrase “pay any price, bear and burden, meet any
hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and success
of liberty” entwined with aspects of alliteration and supporting the theme of
U.S. strength and dominance showcase how JFK was able to effectively convey his
message to his audience.

è
Later
on, as can be seen in the second part of the speech with the pledges,
Saussure’s model comes into play as with the repetition of the phrase “to those
{…} we pledge” the group of people are addressed at the beginning of 7
paragraphs, therefore placing importance on the other groups and of supporting
the purpose of peace and the willingness to work with other foreign nations for
peace and their benefaction.

o  
Repetition
of a specific phrase throughout a couple of paragraphs allowed for a rhythm to
be created by Kennedy as the orator as well as a sense or order and an almost
mantra to be established.

è
Within
the same sentence, his choice of diction further aimed to support his idea of
world peace though his artifice choice of the term “pledge” in which the selection
of the term pledge had a strong meaning and communicated to their tertiary
audience in which he essentially was swearing an oath to all of the nations of
the world that the desire for peace would have no limits.

è
The
hortative sentences that are located the third section of the speech, with repetition
of the phrase “let both sides” and specific choice of the term “let” is a great
distinction from a word such as “must” as the word “let” gives the audience,
this case having the audience being the soviet union, the opportunity to take
advantage of the U.S.’s hand of friendliness as opposed to using an commanding
term such as “must” in order to prompt the target audience into taking action.

è
In
the final section of the speech, Kennedy’s clever use of syntax increases the tertiary
purpose of inspiring and promoting a sense of u.s. progress to the primary
audience being Americans at the time.

o  
In
his inaugural address, the use of the imperative sentence “ask not what your
country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country.” As well as “ask
not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom
of man” to call together the sense of progress to the U.S.

o  
 Along with the repetition of the phrase “my
fellow” located before each sentence

o  
Urges
the American citizens to determinedly work into the new era of the United
States as a hard working and unified country.

 

 

 (30 secs) Conclusion:

è
John
F. Kennedy’s inaugural address was not only a defining moment for JFK but for
the United States as well. This was due to the fact that it was one of the most
simplistic inaugural addresses ever preformed in the history of the United
States. It was free from complicated rhetoric in which people from any social
class in the United States or anywhere else in the world for that matter could
understand as well as focused highly on foreign policy.

è
His speech showcased characteristics of realism, and strength
where parried with

è
The enthusiasm and zeal expressed by the new president through
his usage of stylistic devices, expressions and statements that the general
community could comprehend, and elusions to powerful examples from the time
period allowed for his inaugural address to go down as one of the best speeches
of all time.