Frederick American Slavery” were some of the post

Frederick Douglass was a
slave turned abolitionist. His writings and speeches were used to expose the
hypocrisy of slavery and how it was wrong. He wrote using his own personal
accounts to speak to people. His autobiographies and his speech “The Hypocrisy
of American Slavery” were some of the post powerful and inspiring works surrounding
the fight to end slavery.

Frederick
Douglass was born with full name Frederick Augustus Washington Bayle in February
1818. He was born in Talbot County, Maryland. His parents were slaves so he was
automatically born into slavery, but raised by his grandmother, instead of his
parents, until the age of six. At six, he was sent to work for the Auld family
and while there began to learn to read and write. Some of the family supported his
learning while others strictly prohibited it. Douglass would secretly continue
to self-learn. As a young boy, he learned of and started to yearn for freedom
and human rights. This was strengthened when he went through brutal mental and
physical abuse, inflicted by a “slave breaker”, as he was taught to work in a
field. This experience was life-changing for him because of the level of pain
it inflicted on him. He started to think about escaping slavery for good.

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He
began to save money for his escape from slavery when he worked in the
shipbuilding industry. He failed escape once but was able to escape by dressing
as a sailor and with the aid of Underground Railroad supporters. He settled in
Bedford, Massachusetts in 1838, at the age of twenty with his newlywed wife
Anna Murray-Douglass.

Douglass
spoke in churches and other small venues to spread thoughts of abolition. His
practice of oratory arts allowed him to be discovered by William Coffin, who
introduced him to his mentor William Lloyd Garrison, beginning his abolitionist
career. He held a job as an agent for the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society,
furthering his abolitionist pursuits. Around the same time, he wrote his first
of three autobiographies that described his life as a slave. These biographies
would hold great importance in the future of the movement.

Douglass’
increasingly independent views led to him disputing with Garrison over the
dissolution of the Union, he believed it should remain and Garrison believed
otherwise. His importance grew, giving him enough influence to consult with
President Lincoln, during the Civil War, on slavery and how it was a political
issue. He became a recruiter of black soldiers for the Union Army, and later
fought for the rights of not only blacks but also those of women. He saw his
hard work pay off when African Americans were given citizenship in 1868 and
were given the right to vote in 1870.

Douglass
was at a meeting for National Council of Women on February 20, 1895 and upon
returning home had a heart attack while preparing for a speech at a local
church. He wrote using his own personal accounts to speak to people. His
autobiographies and his speech “The Hypocrisy of American Slavery” were some of
the post powerful and inspiring works surrounding the fight to end slavery. Douglass
is remembered as a great advocate for slave and women’s rights and for his
incredible speeches and writings.